Underwater camouflage.

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Underwater camouflage is the set of methods of achieving crypsis, avoidance of observation—that allows otherwise visible aquatic organism to remain unnoticed by other organisms such as predators or prey,  and also aids predators in capturing their prey.

Three main camouflage methods predominate in water: transparency, reflection, and counterillumination. Transparency and reflectivity are most important in the top 100 metres of the ocean; counterillumination is the main method from 100 metres down to 1000 metres; while camouflage becomes less important in the dark waters below 1000 metres.

Camouflage in relatively shallow waters is more like terrestrial camouflage, where additional methods are used by many animals.  Using color and shape changes, and sometimes adapting to threats with blinding speed, marine species use a variety of tricks to confuse and outsmart likely predators. Some marine animals also use camouflage to lie in wait for prey, which provides the hunters with the element of surprise and conserves valuable energy.

For example, self-decoration is employed by decorator crab, mimesis by animals such as the leafy sea dragons, countershading by many fish including sharks,  distraction with eyespots by many fish; active camouflage, through ability to change colour rapidly in fish such as the flounder, and cephalopods including octopus, cuttlefish  and squids.

The camouflage color or pattern can be inherited or acquired – many fish and some invertebrates are able to change color to match their surroundings. Other animals achieve camouflage by covering themselves, such as by burying in sand, or by attaching foreign objects to their body or shell.

Souther Stingray

Underwater camouflage picture gallery. 

 

 

 

The amazing Yellowhead Jawfish.

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The jawfish are masters of architecture. They use their large mouths to scoop sand from the seabed and then spit it out to one side. They continue to dig until they have created a vertical tunnel with a chamber at its end. The jawfish…   Continue reading →

Yellowhead Jawfish with eggs.

The hardest fish to find on Roatan Reefs

In all these years diving in the waters of Roatan I only had three chances to see a Frog Fish, none of them I’ve found for merely coincidence, with an  exception of the Sargassumfish, the coordinates have helped me reach … Continue reading 

Found at West End Wall dive site 15 feet.

Found at West End Wall dive site 15 feet.

 

Hammerhead Shark encounter!

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It looked like another beautiful  drift dive at Pablo´s Place,  until an unexpected sighting happened… a Hammerhead Shark!!! It was at 40 feet, I came towards me, maybe 20 feet far from where I was, I thought of pulling my camera right away but  when I did he turned and left, still I am very pleased, cause is my second time face to face encounter (literally) with this magnificent creature.

Hammerhead sharks are consummate predators that use their oddly shaped heads to improve their ability to find prey. Their wide-set eyes give them a better visual range than most other sharks.

The great hammerhead is the largest of the nine identified species of this shark. It can grow up to 20 feet (6 meters) in length and weigh up to 1,000 pounds (450 kg), although smaller sizes are more common.

Found in temperate and tropical waters worldwide, far offshore and near shorelines, hammerheads are often seen in mass summer migrations seeking cooler water. They are gray-brown to olive-green on top with off-white undersides, and they have heavily serrated, triangular teeth. Their extra-tall, pointed dorsal fins are easily identifiable.

Pablo´s Place 40 feet.

Pablo´s Place 40 feet.

Pablo´s Place 40 feet.

Pablo´s Place 40 feet.

Butcher´s Bank 40 feet.

Butcher´s Bank 40 feet.